The Maine Public Utility Commission shocked the industry when it was one of the first states to open an opt-out investigation and subsequently order a smart meter opt-out. Despite taking these steps that many in the utility industry disagree with, the Maine Supreme Judicial Court recently told the MPUC it failed to adequately address the health and

I recently had the opportunity to interview the Chairman of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, Robert F. Powelson, regarding his views on smart meter opt-outs and other issues affecting Pennsylvania’s energy future. Because I live and practice in Pennsylvania, I may be biased but I think Smart Grid Legal News readers will agree it is

Millions of Smart Meters are being deployed annually creating the potential for mountains of analog meters to fill up landfills. Utility Services of the Americas has a solution – meter recycling. While attending and presenting at SmartEnergy International 2011 in San Francisco this week, I had the opportunity to speak with Brian Shine and Steven

On May 19, 2011, after taking into consideration all public correspondence and filings, the Maine Public Utilities Commission issued a Part 1 Order requiring Central Maine Power to implement an opt out program. What is interesting about the order is that it seems to go beyond addressing the RF issues and requires more than what

Despite having approved Central Maine Power’s (CMP’s) Automated Metering Infrastructure (AMI) plan in February 2010 as a program designed to “improve customer service, enhance storm restoration efforts, reduce utility operational costs, save ratepayer and utility costs, and ultimately provide customers with necessary tools to use electricity more efficiently,” on January 4, 2011, the Maine