After a brief hiatus, Smart Grid Legal News is back! So many issues and not enough time or space so I thought I would start with the basics. I recently had the pleasure of meeting Christine Hertzog, managing director of Smart Grid Library, to discuss Smart Grid Dictionary, now it its sixth edition. At 466 pages, Smart Grid Dictionary covers acronyms and terms that are not just smart grid related but industry related. If you are new to the industry, the book will quickly become a well-worn staple. Veterans might find it useful to zero in on terms you might gloss over. Like most good ideas, Smart Grid Dictionary was created out of necessity. Trying to navigate an industry riddled with acronyms can be challenging. So for her own use, Christine began keeping a list of terms she hears often and soon Smart Grid Dictionary was born. Perusing through the dictionary, some of the terms that I take for granted, like classes of service or rate case, made me smile as I thought about how they could be confusing to those not enmeshed in this regulatory world. Below is a random sample of terms found in the Smart Grid Dictionary:

ADA (Advanced Distribution Automation)
A collection of intelligent sensors, remote controllers and bi-directional communications to manage distribution grids – covering substations to AMI assets.

Classes of service
A class or group of customers with similar characteristics that have a common rate for electric service. Some common classifications are residential, commercial, industrial and transportation.

Electric industry restructuring
The reconfiguration of vertically integrated electric utilities into markets with competing sellers, allowing customers to choose their suppliers but still receive delivery over the power lines of the local utility. Generation is now generally competitive, transmission is regulated by FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) and distribution falls under state jurisdictions.

ICAP (Installed Capacity)
A monthly market run by an ISO (Independent System Operator) that provides generators compensation for locating units in specific regions based on the net capacity the unit provides to the market after accounting for forced outages at the unit.

IEEE 2030.5
This standard incorporates Smart Energy Profile (SEP) 2.0. It defines application message exchange mechanisms, the exact messages exchanged and the security features used to protect the application messages. This enables utility management of the end user energy environment, including demand response, load control, and time of day pricing among other functions.